pistoletto.jpg

Il Segno Arte
Michelangelo Pistoletto
1993-1994

Seven Volvic lava stones placed at crossings, 10 x 210 x 120 cm

Commande publique of the Ministère de la culture et de la communication (owner Ciap) in 1994

Born in 1933 in Biella in Italy, Michelangelo Pistoletto still lives and works there. 

“The work consists in seven sculptures in Volvic lava stone installed horizontally on the ground, that is to say, buried their full thickness so that they are flush and can be stood on and trodden … Each element is laid out at the crossing of two or more paths, following a ring movement that develops inside the wooded slope of the Island, along the route usually taken by visitors. The project is called Il Segno Arte (Sign Art), for which I defined a form to identify the concept of “art”. The references of this sign in its physical and material existence are multiple in the very image of art that can reveal and condense opposite terms: division-union, closure-overture, conjunction-separation, surface-perspective, design-material, concept-object, implosion-explosion, laceration-holding, static-dynamic, like the butterfly born of metamorphosis, so weight-lightness. Il Segno Arte is situated at the crossroads to accentuate the feeling of structural holding in the focal points that join together the different directions: arrival and departure, divergence and choice, possibility and decision. This work does not rise vertically like a traditional monument, but lies horizontally on the ground to assume the fluid dimension of time. The work is fertile the whole length of its trajectory, not in just one point, so it is not at all invasive. It expresses the color of the elements like natural erosion and the slow degradation that results from the ritual, continuous passage of visitors. This is horizontality as time sliding.

 Il Segno Arte is part of an idea that I showed in 1976 with the book A Hundred Exhibits (…). Carrying out the project at Vassivière is its durable testimony.” (Michelangelo Pistoletto)

 

Copyright: Jacques Hoepffner


Print